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arrived in baghdad for his trip in pakistan. nice to see you. >> i'm away. you're away. >> we're here. >> anyway. let's talk about leon panetta. >> yeah. >> the old unannounced visit. it will be a mark -- one of the things that really pointing out is accusations of iran arming iraqi insurgents using the weapons, obviously, against u.s. troops. i've been there 11 times. they used to say this years ago, that the iranians were providing technology as the charges that were doing so much damage to u.s. armored vehicles. now they're talking about it being rockets and things like that, upping the ante in terms of the weaponry. and leon panetta saying the u.s. won't stand for that. they'll protect the troops. last month was a bad month for u.s. troops. more than a dozen troops were kills in iraq. worst month in two years, exactly two years. >> is there a message here from iran as we start to pull -- as u.s. starts to pull troops out of iraq? they're supposed to be out by the end of this year? >> yeah, well, you know, iran had a lot of influence in iraq really for years now. it's one of the by
. >>> then pulling the plug on pakistan. we're holding back hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. will that make them a better ally or push them into the arms of our enemy? >>> joining me now from capitol hill to discuss the top story we've been talking about, is cnn congressional correspondent kate bolduan. have they had any breakthrough in the negotiations? they just talk, talk, talk. >> i often feel like i'm repeating myself. we have to tell you, there's no breakthroughs to report this evening. the meeting at the white house lasted about an hour and 45 minutes. i'm told from congressional sources that the focus was largely on the framework that had kind of been identified and come to pass in the biden talks. these are talks that were bipartisan talks that lasted for weeks and fell apart. republicans saying that there was an impasse having to do with taxes, in that package of savings, if you will, that was identified. it was largely had to do with spending cuts. republicans, by their math, said they had come to about $2 trillion plus in savings, but the president disputed their math saying acc
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff admiral -- chairman admiral mike mullen says china should no longer be described as a rising power, declaring it's a full-fledged world power hp he made the remarks at the start of a four-day visit to beijing. he called on china to become a global partner in addressing security challenges in asia and beyond. >>> jay si dugard speaking about her 18 years in captivity at the hands of philly and nancy garrido. she was 11 when kidnapped by garrido, a convicted sex offender, as she was walking to school. she talked about the long, horrifying ordeal with abc's diane sawyer. >> you would never know what she survived unless yo
you, pat. the u.s. embassy under attack in syria. how is the united states responding? in pakistan they are burning our flags. and we are giving them millions. [ male announcer ] there's more barbeque time in every bag of kingsford charcoal. kingsford. slow down and grill. . >> our flag on fire, the u.s. embassy under attack as was the american ambassador's residence, people described as "thugs," reaching the wall of the embassy compound and breaking cameras and bonds and the united states is seeking compensation for the damage. meanwhile the united states announcing cutting back aid to pakistan. $800 million in military aid is being withheld after they decided to cancel vistas for 100 military trainers and my guest says the cuts are a good start. lieutenant colonel peters joins me. welcome. this is 40 percent of our annual aid to pakistan. should we retract the rest of it, as well? >>guest: i wish we could cut all aid to pakistan. pakistan is a rogue state. the pakistani military and security services are addicted to terror and we keep giving them money for another fix. but we can
to pakistan. >> right now, they've taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military. >> and new tensions since the killing of usama bin laden as we keep 800 million dollars in our american pockets. and. and.... >> making america proud on the global stage. the u.s. soccer team triumphs over brazil at the women's world cup with a come from behind win. tonight, the thrilling action that propelled the red, white and blue to the semifinals. first, leon panetta making his first visit to iraq as the new u.s. secretary of defense. touching down in baghdad, after leaving afghanistan, we told you, forecast end could be near for al-qaeda and push iraqi leaders for the american forces in their country and the u.s. scheduled to withdraw all of the 46,000 troops by the end of the year, but ongoing security concerns now prompting new talk of keeping some u.s. experts in place. the highest ranking officer, mike mullen on a four day visit to china, voicing serious new concerns that disputes between china and neighbors may spark unforeseen confli
crying, it's going to be okay. martha: well, tension is mounting in pakistan. the united states has announced that it will withhold millions in military aid there. so the pakistani government sources unfazed by this apparent snub, but some diplomats are calling it, quote, an unwise move on the part of the united states. many experts now worry what this will mean for the already very stormy relationship between the united states and pakistan, especially in light of the bin laden capture and kill. conor powell joins me live from islamabad with the latest on that. hi, connor. >> reporter: well, hi, martha. well, to describe the afghan -- or the american/pakistan relationship as stormy is massively becoming a real understatement. it is down right poisonous and hostile at times now. for the last ten years or so, the united states has given about $20 billion to pakistan's military for the larger war on terror. this year alone they were meant to give $2 billion. but over the weekend the white house announced that it's withholding $800 million to the pakistani military. now, officially, the
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
the u.s. and pakistan have been even more tense since bin laden was killed. today, word tensions may have reached a new high. plus in the race for the white house, new hampshire, of course, a key stop. congressman with local roots will share his insight on which contenders could see success in his state. stay with us. [ mom ] one of the challenges for kayla being gluten-free is actually finding choices the whole family will love. five flavors of chex are gluten-free, including the honey nut flavor. and it's nice for me to be able to syes" to something that they want to eat. [ male announcer ] chex cereal. five flavor gluten free to something that they want to eat. funny thing about vegetables... they fill you up without filling you out. yes! v8 juice gives you three of your five daily servings of vegetables. that's what i'm talking about! v8. what's your number? a living, breathing intelligence that's helpi drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibil
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
, to look beyond just india, pakistan, afghanistan. and i think, you know, it's the right way to approach it. it wasn't too explicit, but it was a way of nudging them, saying, come on, guys, you've got to keep an eye on what's going on in asia right now. >> let's explore deeper. let's stay on the china part. you note she has to be careful, but she was also pretty obvious. she was talking about india's democracy and growing economy, and india can, quote, inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance. it's not hard to guess what she's talking about openness and tolerance, who is she talking about there? >> look, i think that this is a grand tradition of american diplomacy which is when we want to have a strategic relationship with china, we want to have a cooperative relationship with china but we do have our preferences and we've always said, every president, democrat and republican, for 30, 40 years, that, you know, when compared with dictatorships and closed systems, we prefer democracies and open systems. and so we're trying to make that association and make it plain. y
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
in iraq after the withdrawal deadline in december. officials in pakistan today played down a u.s. decision to suspend $800 million in military aid. u.s. officials confirmed it on sunday. but, a pakistani spokesman insisted today that operations would continue without external support. tensions between the two nations have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times"
on the side of safety. host: unless the administration certifies that pakistan is making progress in fighting terrorism, this is what howard berman of california has to say -- guest: i agree with that premise. we need to keep pressure on pakistan to make absolutely sure that no part of their government supports radical organizations like the taliban are al qaeda. we have to remember that they are alert -- they are nuclear power. we do not want radical elements in getting control all those weapons. in addition, pakistan is a conduit to get weapons in to fight the taliban. it is a thorny issue in the one that we have to work out. to cut up pakistan immediately would be a mistake. host: greg, independent line. caller: as long as the budget is an issue, eliminate the patriots back, homeland security, the police. fire those people. fire them right now. get the money from there. no one was concerned about the budget when bush was fighting a war on two fronts. i was in the national guard and the marines. i did not go the last three times because my son came back. the national guard, it is a good thi
of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan as well as in yemen. >> panetta is also meeting with american troops. president obama wants to bring about 10,000 service members back home this year, and 20,000 next year. >>> a strong earthquake in japan prompted a brief tsunami warning today. a magnitude 7.3 quake shook the northeast coast, the same area devastated by the march earthquake and tsunami. residents received orders to evacuate this morning, but the tsunami order was lifted after several hours. >>> house speaker john boehner is abandoning plans to pursue a massive $4 trillion deficit reduction package. speaker boehner says a smaller agreement is more realistic. >> both men agree, it's going to hurt. but where to find that money? that's where the two camps divide. republicans don't want tax increases. democrats want to keep entitlements like medicare, and social security in tact. so far, no one is budging. the two sides will meet in the white house again sunday inside. >> we agree on some of the big thingsment we agree after a decade of racking up deficits and debt, we
bin laden, we've now identified some of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan, as well as in yemen and other areas. that if we can be successful at going after them, i think we can really undermine their ability. heather: all right. well, you heard it there. are we really that close to wiping out al-qaeda? let's ask peter brooks, a senior fellow for national security affairs at the hurtarg foundation and a former cia officer, he joins us live from washington. good morning peter. >> good morning, heather. heather: what do you think about that assessment, do you agree with it? >> i certainly hope he's right. i'm not sure what he's basing it on. i think what they've done here is they believe they're on the verge of strategically de feeding al-qaeda because they've gotten rid of bin laden, they have to get rid of zawahiri and they have ten, 20 other leaders they believe they will be able to target in pakistan, somalia, the other country he didn't mention, so i hope he knows something i don't know but what i worry about, this may have two backdrops to it. one, it could make
this route. i think that's clear. obviously, al qaeda is spread out to the arabian peninsula, pakistan areas, and the rest. but it's about continuing this route. many people are concerned if there's a withdrawal of u.s. troops they shouldn't be too dramatic or swift to withdraw before al qaeda and taliban are defeated. >> christiane, i appreciate your analysis. i want to remind everybody, be sure to watch christiane a little later this morning on "this week." she has an exclusive interview with white house chief of staff bill daley. bianna, over to you. >>> not too far from here at rancho mirage, california, preparations are under way for the funeral of former first lady betty ford. family and friends will gather tuesday for a celebration of life service. barbara pinto has more on the nation saying good-bye to a brave and beloved woman who touched so many lives. >> r rorter: her candor and courage touched the nation. and now we know more how betty ford's family will pay tribute. >> people in america and across the world, they are going to say good-bye and they want to pay tribute to her. and
. first, a news update. >> 17 past the hour. pakistan intelligence officials say 38 alleged militants have been killed by three suspected u.s. missiles in northwestern pakistan. this is in less than 12 hours. the attacks come two days after the obama administration suspended more than one-third of u.s. military aid to pakistan, about $800 million. the attacks indicate the white house has no intention of stopping the drone program. syria is accusing the u.s. a provocation after secretary of state hillary clinton said the president had lost legitimacy and was "not indispensable." this is one day after hamas attacked embassies. violent uprisings have been happening over the last four months as rebels tried to oust president assaad and and his family's 40-year rule. in the states, the gao says the government is making it more difficult to detect medicare fraud. in a report to be released today, they say the government systems for analyzing medicare and medicaid data are "inaccurate and underused." fraudulent claims are between $60 billion and $90 billion per year. we will hear more about that
and then there will be a social crisis, and then a political crisis. then right across the world pakistan has got concerns about the loss of aid and the impact that this would have on fighting terror. israel is worried about the position of the u.s. and the world that if the u.s. is weak at this point, then countries leak iran will start to feel emboldened. here in the us u.k. they're saying that internal u.s. political wrangling are pose aing real threat to the world's financial systems, alex. >>> it is a word president obama has been using repeatedly in the battle over raising the debt limit, but are enough lawmakers on capitol hill heeding his advice? we'll have the latest from the white house next on msnbc saturday. >> what's clear now is that any solution to avoid default must be bipartisan. it must have the support of both parties that we're sent here to represent the american people. not just one faction. the time for putting party first is over. the time for compromise on behalf of the american people is now. i am confident that we can solve this problem. i'm confident that we will solve this problem.
all the insurgents were arabs and czechens brought in by pakistan by the hakani insurgent network, an al qaeda affiliate. master sergeant benjamin stevenson was hit toward the end to have the firefight. he was quickly medevaced out of the combat area, but died shortly thereafter of his injuries. after ten tours of duty, he is survived by his wife and two sons. he was the only u.s. service member who was killed in that fight. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. >>> we are expecting a flurry of activity in washington, d.c., today, and it is expected to get underway in about an hour or so. they are in session this weekend, trying to beat the clock. stay with us. maybe, it's something you haven't seen yet. the 2nd generation of intel core processors. this is visibly smart. discover aveeno positively radiant tinted moisturizers with scientifically proven soy complex and natural minerals. give you sheer coverage instantly, then go on to even skin tone in four weeks. aveeno tinted moisturizers. from the teachers to the students. i had a student the other day that said... "miss stacy, this
that the u.s. owes it to the world to come to a solution and to do it quickly. further afield in pakistan there are worries about the loss of badly needed aid and the impact on anti-terrorism initiatives there, and israel is also saying that this threatens the position that the u.s. holds in the world and this could be construed as a sign of real weakness by countries like iran. here in the u.k. there's a feeling that internal u.s. political wranglings are posing a real threat, alex, to the world financial systems. >> yeah. how about the headlines that people are waking up to over there? are they pretty bold? >> well, actually, you know, it's not really making front page news at the moment. you know, it's -- there is a lot of reaction, and it's been reported as political theater. some of the hldz, though, are about savers desserting the stock because of the debt crisis, how the u.s. is playing with fire as the deadline looms, but, as i say, it's not front page news yet. there are some funny asides. one paper called is debt-ageddon and one says apple has much more cash than the u.s. govern
that wasted like pakistan. share the wealth and do not cut education. >> the one thing i would say about giving money to countries that we stick with pakistan listed, i think it is important for people to know the foreign aid accounts for less than 2% of our budget. if you define it as the foreign if you define it as the foreign aid to help feed people and classic foreign-aid, it is closer to 1%. sometimes people have an exaggerated sense that we spend 25% of the federal budget on foreign aid. it is a tiny amount that has a big impact. for america to be a leader in the world and have influence, to help stabilize countries and great opportunity for people so they do not breed terrorists or create huge refugee flows, it is smart for us to make a modest investment in foreign aid. it is a force multiplier. it is something american needs to continue to do in our role as a global leader. >> the next one is simple from daniel. we need to raise taxes. [laughter] >> as i have said before, if wealthy individuals are willing to simply go back to the rates whenexisted in the 1990's rich people were
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
26, 2008, in the remote east of afghanistan near the border of pakistan. helicopters carrying thousands of elite army rangers race over the rugged landscape. their target is an insurgent compound. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed, but it is considered a risk worth taking, because intelligence indicates a toss out the -- a top of kited commander is in that compound. -- a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. within minutes, lee roy and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls, and that is when the enemy opened up with ak-47s. leroy is hit. he is leaving badly, but he summons the strength to lead the other rangers -- he is a badly, gla -- bleeding but he summons the strength to lead other rangers. an enemy grenade explosions nearby, wounding and leroy's two comrades, and a second grenade lands only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that is what the sergeant could have done. instead, this wounded ranger, the 28-ye
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